At Bad Axe Throwing we don’t just let you throw an axe. We want you to make some awesome memories, and what better way to do that than playing a handful of exciting axe throwing games! If you see any games you are most interested in, please mention them to a coach on your trip to Bad Axe Throwing. We’ll be happy to make sure you get to play your favourites.

BAD AXE

1v1 or Teams

The axe throwing version of HORSE! Players from competing teams throw head to head. The lower cumulative score total receives a letter. The first team to have BAD AXE spelled out loses. Ties result in 1 additional overtime throw. If the score is still tied after overtime, no letters are awarded and the next 2 throwers step up.

Variants:

  • Closer to Horse
    • The second thrower needs to match the point value of the first thrower, rather than beat it. If the second thrower fails to match the point value of the first thrower, they get a letter. If they succeed in matching it then no letters are awarded, and it becomes the second thrower’s turn to throw first.
  • Closest to Horse
    • The first thrower must call the point value they are aiming at. For example, 3 on the left side or 1 on the top half. If they hit what they called, their opponent must stick the same throw, or else they get a letter. If their opponent sticks the throw then no letters are awarded, and it becomes the second thrower’s turn to throw first.

First to “X”

1v1 or Teams

A simple point accumulation game with a ton of variants. Each time a player scores points, that number of points is added to their team’s total score. The first team to break through “X” number of points wins the game (“X” being decided based on available time and skill level of the group).

Note: This game can be played by starting at 0 and playing to “X”, or by starting at “X” and subtracting points until they get to 0.

Variants:

  • Busted:
    • To win, the team must land exactly on the number “X”. If a team “busts” and gets more points than “X”, there are other variants.
      1. No points are awarded for the throw that puts them over the score limit, no points are deducted. The game continues until one team lands exactly on “X”
      2. The score goes down to a predetermined other number “Y” (ex. 50/30: if a team gets over 50 points, they go back to 30)
      3. The team that busts loses
  • Blue Dots:
    • Wild card – If a bust rule is enforced, blue dots can be worth up to 10 points (a blue dot will not put you over “X”)
    • Score flipper – Hitting a blue dot gives you 10 points or the option to swap scores with the opposing team
    • Subtractor – Blue dots do not give 10 points to the thrower’s team, but rather takes 10 (or 15) points away from the other team
  • Shot Caller:
    • If a player calls their shot (point value), they receive double points for that throw (ex. calling a 4 and hitting a 4 awards 8 points). A miss awards 0 points

Landmines

1v1 or Teams

Teams start at 50 points and play to 100. Set 4 landmine numbers along the way: 1 in the 60s, 1 in the 70s, 1 in the 80s, and 1 in the 90s. These are typically set in the same 1s digit (ex. 65, 75, 85, 95 are landmines). Landing on a landmine sends the thrower’s team back by 10 points from the number they started at (ex. Starting at 63 and hitting a landmine sends the team to 53). Landmines are common to both teams. Once a landmine is hit, it is safe to hit for the rest of the game (like real landmines, they can only blow up once!).

Cornhole

1v1 or 2v2

Traditionally this axe throwing game is played to exactly 21, but can be played just as easily to “X”. What sets this game apart is the unique scoring method. After one player from each team throws, the lower score is subtracted from the higher score, and the difference is awarded to the team with the higher scoring throw.

For example: Steve gets a 6, Sally gets a 1; Steve is awarded 5 points (6 minus 1).

  • Matchups matter! Players with similar skill levels will score similar points, making the game progress more slowly/competitively
  • It matters who throws first, since there is a point subtraction involved. Traditionally, whichever team scored most recently throws first (even if they have a lower point total). It is recommended to switch who throws first each turn.

Around The World

1v1

Each team must hit every number on the board from low to high, in order, and then again in reverse, in reverse order. In other words, each team must hit a 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 4, 3, 2, 1. First team to complete the loop wins. You can make this game harder by requiring each team hit the blue dot after the second time they score a 1 in order to win.

Connect 5

1v1 or Teams

Create a 5×5 grid and assign 5 of each number on the grid in a random pattern. Designate which team/player throws first (they will throw first for the entirety of the match). Each player throws once, if both players hit the same number, the player who throws first gets to pick which spot is claimed on the grid.

First team to get five in a row (down, across, or diagonal) wins!

  • A Kill Shot can be hit at any time to remove a mark from the other team on the grid.
  • If every grid spot for a certain number are claimed. Hitting that number on the target is just a wasted throw.

Humans VS Zombies

Teams (Minimum 6 Players)

This game is played with two fluid teams: Humans and Zombie(s). All players except for 1 start on the human team. The lone player is the starting Zombie (Patient Zero). Gameplay involves 1 zombie throwing against 1 human at a time, using the cornhole scoring method. Traditionally, zombies throw first. There are 3 possible outcomes per turn:

  • Human wins – Humans get the difference in points
  • Zombie wins – Human player turns into a zombie (joins zombie team)
  • Tie – No points awarded, human stays human

The Zombies win if all human players are converted to zombies (zombies never gain nor need points). Humans win by reaching a predetermined score total (typically 21 points, 16 for smaller groups)

Variants:

  • Blue Antidote
    • Blue dots serve as antidotes for the human team, allowing them to bring one zombie back to the human team (excluding Patient Zero)
  • Zombie Bust
    • Humans must land exactly on the predetermined point total
  • Humans throw first
    • Gives a slight advantage to the zombie team

Killers

Teams (Maximum 10 Players)

Players start by throwing for their number assignments. The number that they hit is their assigned number. No two players on the same team can have the same number. If a player hits a number that has already been assigned to someone on their team, that player must throw again (2 throws max, then rotate) until they hit a unique number.

  • Number assignments shouldn’t take much time. If it gets too drawn out, feel free to employ other methods for assigning players their numbers.
  • Although there is some strategy in choosing a number, there is no clear-cut advantage to any part of the board. The player assigned number 6 (bullseye) will be harder to knock out, but will also be harder for them to become a killer
  • Depending on the number of players, not all numbers available will be assigned

Each player starts with 3 lives. Players start by aiming for their own number assignments. When a player hits their own number twice, they become a “killer.” When a “killer” hits the number of a player on the opposing team, that player loses a life. The game ends when one team eliminates all players from the opposing team.

Cricket

1v1 or Teams

Each team must hit all predetermined numbers on the board 3 times, putting up 1 mark each time a number is hit. Once a team has hit a number 3 times, that number is “closed out,” and is then available for scoring (if playing for points). Once both teams close out a number, the number is “dead” and will do nothing for either team that hits it for the rest of the game.

Variants:

  • Easy Cricket
    • Only numbers 1-4 need to be closed out
    • Bullseyes put 2 marks on the board on any number(s) of the thrower’s choosing
    • Blue dots put 3 marks on the board on any number(s) of the thrower’s choosing
    • Winner – First team to close out all numbers
  • Medium Cricket
    • Only numbers 1-4 need to be closed out
    • Bullseyes put 2 marks on the board on any number(s) of the thrower’s choosing OR 6 points
    • Blue dots put 3 marks on the board on any number(s) of the thrower’s choosing OR 10 points
    • When a team closes out a number, that number of points is awarded to that team with each subsequent hit (ex. If 3s are closed, every 3 the team hits from then on earns them 3 points)
    • Once both teams close out the same number, the number is “dead.” Nothing happens if either team hits a dead number.
    • Winner – First team to close out all numbers and have a higher score
  • Advanced Cricket
    • All numbers 1-6 need to be closed out
    • Blue dots put 3 marks on the board on any number(s) of the thrower’s choosing OR 10 points
    • When a team closes out a number, that number of points is awarded to that team with each subsequent hit (ex. If 3s are closed, every 3 the team hits from then on earns them 3 points)
    • Once both teams close out the same number, the number is “dead.” Nothing happens if either team hits a dead number.
    • Winner – First team to close out all numbers and have a higher score

Notes for Medium and Advanced Cricket:

  • The game is not over once one team closes out all of their numbers. If a team has everything closed out but fewer points, the game must continue until that team meets all criteria to win. Additional points can be scored on numbers that the opposing team has yet to close out, and can always be scored on bullseyes and blue dots.
  • You should not rush your throwers. If one team has a number closed out and the other team has hit it twice, you will have to decide whether to favor offense or defense. You should deal with the scores simultaneously, rather than awarding the points/close out to the thrower who throws first.
    • For example: Team A has 4s closed out, Team B has hit two 4s. Favoring the offense means that if a player from Team B hits their third 4, the player from Team A has only that throw as a last chance to score on 4s.

Baseball

Teams

Each “inning” consists of one team “batting” and the other “fielding,” and then vice versa. Players cycle through their rotation so that the same “pitcher” and “batter” throw against each other until the batter is out or gets on base.

This game is not for everyone! It can go very quickly or be extremely tedious. Exercise good judgment when deciding whether to play this game or not with a group, and don’t commit to too many innings (3 is generally a good place to start, you can always add extra innings from there).

The pitcher always throws first, always aiming for a bullseye. The batter throws second, attempting to beat the score of the pitcher. This results in three possible scenarios:

  • The pitcher has the high score – the batter is out. Both the pitcher and batter rotate out, the next 2 throwers step up
  • The batter has the high score – The batter advances the number of bases that is the difference between the scores (*bullseyes count as 5 points in this game). This advances any other runners already on base the same number of bases. This concludes the turn, the next two throwers step up.
    • Example 1: There is a runner on 2nd base, pitcher throws a 2, batter throws a 3. The batter “hits a single” and goes to 1st base, the runner on 2nd base advances to 3rd base.
    • Example 2: There are runners on 1st base and 3rd base. The pitcher throws a 3, the batter throws a bullseye (5 points). The batter “hits a double” and goes to 2nd base, the runner on 1st base advances to 3rd base, and the runner on 3rd base comes home and scores a run.
  • The batter ties the score of the pitcher – This counts as a strike, both players throw again. If this happens three times in a row the batter is out, and the next two throwers step up.
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